Cranium launches out of KPMGs venture studio to tackle AI security

News Summary

  • It looks to address gaps in other solutions by providing better visibility into AI systems, providing security into core adversarial risks and providing supply chain visibility.”To that end, Cranium attempts to map AI pipelines and validate their security, monitoring for outside threats.
  • The Cranium platform instills security and trust across the entire AI lifecycle, ensuring enterprises achieve the benefits they hope to get from AI while also managing against unforeseen risks.”Cranium currently has around 30 full-time employees.
  • Others, like Robust Intelligence, CalypsoAI and Troj.ai, offer a range of products designed to make AI systems more robust.Cranium is starting from behind, without customers or revenue to speak of.The elephant in the room is that it’s difficult to pin down real-world examples of attacks against AI systems.
  • Several years ago, Jonathan Dambrot, a partner at KPMG, was helping customers deploy and develop AI systems when he started to notice certain gaps in compliance and security.
  • But some of the more common ones involve poisoning (contaminating the data that an AI’s trained on) and text-based attacks (tricking AI with malicious instructions).Cranium makes the claim that, working within an existing machine learning model training and testing environment, it can address these threats head-on.
  • But there’s little public reporting on attempts by hackers to, for example, attack commercial facial recognition systems — assuming such attempts are happening in the first place.For what it’s worth, SYN managing partner Jay Leek, an investor in Cranium, thinks there’s a future in AI robustness.
Several years ago, Jonathan Dambrot, a partner at KPMG, was helping customers deploy and develop AI systems when he started to notice certain gaps in compliance and security. According to him, no one [+4562 chars]